Can We Change our Behavior to Make Us Happier?

This is a fun and creative title sequence for “The Happy Film” (scheduled to be released in 2012). It was directed by reknown designers Stefan Sagmeister and Hillman Curtis, produced by Ben Nabors, and cinematography by Ben Wolf.

Notes about the movie (from official website):

The Happy Film takes a look at the strategies serious psychologists ‘recommend to improve one’s personal well-being and overall happiness. Questions such as ‘Is it possible to train our mind in the same way’ that we train our bodies?’ and ‘Can we change our behavior to make’us happier?’ will be put to the test in this highly visual documentary.

Designer Stefan Sagmeister will attempt a long list of various strategies – ‘from the sublime to the ridiculous – and report back on the results. ‘The documentary’s experiments and explorations are loosely based on Stefan’s book Things I Have Learned in My Life So Far. Though the focus will be on the ability of meditation, cognitive therapy, and pharmaceuticals to significantly alter well-being – the maxims from his book will ‘serve as access points to a larger exploration of happiness, it’s cultural’ significance, our constant pursuit of it, and its uniquely ephemeral nature. Throughout these experiments, our team will work closely with a group’ of health professionals to properly define and assess Stefan’s happiness.

Links via: Film stills © The Happy Film Link via Boooooom  &  

Illusion.com

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Stelarc: Pushing the body’s boundaries

Stelarc.jpg

(Image: Newspix/Rex Features)

(Image: Newspix/Rex Features)

The Australian performance artist with an ear on his arm discusses his work challenging what it is to be human

As an artist, what is your role in shaping technology?
It’s a very modest one. Each new technology generates novel information and unexpected images of the body and the world, which often destabilises our paradigms of what a body is and how it operates. Technology generates uncertainty, it constructs the unexpected. That’s what makes it exciting to incorporate as part of artistic expression.

What is it about the boundaries of the body that fascinates you?
All of my projects explore alternate anatomical architectures – a body with a third hand, or an extra ear, or an artwork inside a bodily space instead of a public space.

We are biological bodies, but we are often accelerated, augmented and enhanced by technology. There may be a time soon when bodies become portals of sensory experience. I might be able to see with your eyes when you are in New York, for example, or listen with someone’s ears from London. We can no longer think of the body as simplistically bound by its skin and containing a single self.

Will it become harder to tell where we end and technology begins?
That’s beginning to be the case. In 1000 years’ time, perhaps technology will be invisible because it will be inside our bodies. We will be able to recolonise the human body with micromachines, nanosensors and nanobots that augment our bacterial and viral population.

Will the body become obsolete?
I think that the body is obsolete. From the standpoint that it’s increasingly inadequate to cope with the technological terrain it inhabits. That doesn’t mean we can do without a body; there has to be some kind of embodiment. But I think the possibilities are there for unexpected hybrids of biology, technology and computer code. We are very much a meat, metal and software system now.

Do you worry that your work combining technology and the body might jeopardise your health?
There’s been no deliberate attempt to endanger the body, but to do anything physically difficult or technically complicated, yes, those actions might be risky. You do things with a positive attitude and a sense that you need to do this if you are to achieve anything.

Is physical discomfort part of exploring the body’s boundaries?
Only in a very general sense. If you are going to suspend your body with 18 hooks in the skin, and you are going to be hoisted 60 metres high by a large crane, there may be all sorts of possible problems. You anticipate those and try to take appropriate precautions. Those performances were not done to have a painful experience.

Why do you have an ear on your left arm?
At the moment this is only a relief of an ear. It’s partly surgically constructed and partly cell grown. We need to surgically lift the helix to create an ear flap, and then we will grow a soft earlobe using my adult stem cells. When the ear is more of a three dimensional structure we will reinsert the microphone and connect it to a wireless transmitter. Then any Wi-Fi hotspot will internet-enable the ear.

We are replicating a bodily structure, relocating and then rewiring it for additional capabilities.

Read More over here: http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/culturelab/2011/07/stelarc-pushing-the-bodys-boundaries.html

Walking Table by Wouter Scheublin

It is definitely tough to be a design blogger. The man in question behind the creation of a cool, walking table is designer Wouter Scheublin. The new Walking Table is quintessentially Dutch, exceptionally functional, aesthetically pioneering, and yet appealingly strange table that produces strong opinions. The table is a cautiously crafted piece of furniture, which shows the exquisiteness of mechanics. It comes to life when pushed and mimics an innate walking motion, mystifying our perception of the typically static piece of furniture. As the name suggests, the Walking Table is human-powered, integrating a mechanical linkage. It is accessible in a walnut edition of only 8 pieces, each delicately crafted from selected materials.

Designer : Wouter Scheublin

 

Walking Table

Walking Table

Too Odd Or Distinctly ArtFull?

See more over here and Here

Electric Hyper Touch Guitar Replaces The Strings with Multi-Touch Screen

As sleek as it looks, the new Hyper Touch Guitar is amply customizable and flexible to musician needs as well. A multi-touch screen has replaced the strings and allows myriad possibilities of expression via perfect instrument customization. Without having to worry about changing the strings and sound effects, the electric hyper touch guitar acts as a wireless command center from which you can manage your music. Well, the design maintains its iconic shape of standard electric guitars with additional enhancements and improvisation. Some controls including tone, volume as well as tremolo are maintained for rapid and intuitive use. It offers ease in handling and adapts greatly to musician needs.

Designer : Massimo Battaglia

 

Hyper Touch Guitar

Hyper Touch Guitar

Hyper Touch Guitar

Hyper Touch Guitar

Not sure if the Hardcore musician is going to be happy with this development though! 🙂

See More over here:

Weird and Wacky Cartoon inspired Furniture By Straight Line Designs

Straight Line Designs is a one-of-a-kind workshop that has been operating out of Vancouver, British Columbia for the past 25 years. In addition to installations, sculptures and private commissions, designer Judson Beaumont and his staff of eight full-time craftspeople have designed and constructed a variety of custom-built furniture and projects for public institutions and children’s exhibitions throughout North America and abroad. Focused on quality and custom design, Judson’s studio stays far away from mass production. Our workshop’s building capacity is restricted but Jud’s designing ability is not!

Tear Away Credenza
22” W x 60”H x 18” D
Eastern Maple, Maple Veneer, Baltic Birch, Mahogany Veneer

Crash Table
36” W x 18”H x 18” D
Western Maple, Maple Veneer

Brian
16” W x 40”H x 16” D
Stained MDF

Beaver Cabinet
60″ W x 60”H x 16” D
Eastern Maple, Maple Veneer

Burnt Table
22” W x 20.5”H x 22” D
Eastern Maple, Maple Veneer

Boom! Cabinet
52.5” W x 21.25”H x 12” D (assembled)
Western Maple, Maple Veneer, Wall-Mounted Cleated Drawers

Bad Table
40” W x 18”H x 20” D
Western Maple, Maple Veneer, Aluminium, IKEA Carpet

Judson’s plan for Straight Line is to continue strengthening its ability to creatively design and build more inspiring environments for hospitals, airports, day care centers, play areas, and clients’ homes. He is committed to providing quality workmanship, which in this day and age of disposability can be a rarity. Straight Line Designs Inc. is receiving more and more press in newspapers, magazines, blogs and other media. Judson will continue showing his work both through multimedia as well as furniture design shows and exhibitions.

Daddy Long Legs
14.25” W x 48”-84″H x 12” D
Western Maple, Maple Veneer

For many more designs by Straight Line Designs: Go-Here

 

30 Outstanding Tutorials for Photo Manipulation in Photoshop

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Scratch Art: U.S. Dollars Sculpted Into Incredible Works

Where art is concerned, is the medium as important as the message? In his 2011 exhibition Noblesse Oblige, tattoo artist Scott Campbell explores some unconventional materials that call into question our perceptions of that unique relationship. His series of carvings made of uncut U.S. currency throw together unparalleled opulence (wasting money) and working-class imagery.

 

Campbell’s history as a tattoo artist shows through in the images he carves into huge stacks of American money. Relying heavily on skulls, skeletons, butterflies and other pictures that would be at home in the pages of a flash book in a tattoo studio, these unusual sculptures are truly a study in differences.

These pieces, with their tattoo art sensibilities and the over-the-top abundance of their materials, present a strange type of experience for fine art lovers. Much like the artists who paint with their own blood or box up their own excrement, the medium changes the message.

Read more over here: Via weburbanist