YouTube Brings Easy Video Editing to the Masses

Want proof that anything that can be done on the desktop can be done in your web browser?

YouTube has just announced its brand-spanking new online video editor–allowing anyone to make simple edits and improvements to their uploaded videos.

You’ll find it located inside of TestTube–how cute–because it’s a little rough around the edges, but the functionality includes:

  • Combine multiple videos you’ve uploaded to create a new longer video
  • Trim the beginning and/or ending of your videos
  • Add soundtracks from our AudioSwap library of tens of thousands of songs
  • Create new videos without worrying about file formats and publish them to YouTube with one click — no upload necessary

OK, so maybe not quite as sophisticated as Adobe Premier or iMovie, but I suspect the above features represent about 80% of most video editing needs.

read more via http://www.marketingpilgrim.com/2010/06/youtube-brings-easy-video-editing-to-the-masses.html

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Make Your Own 3D Glasses in 10 Seconds

You’ll need a pair of 3D glasses with red and blue (to be more precise, cyan) lenses to watch any of the 3D videos that are available on YouTube or this pool of 3D images (anaglyphs) that’s on Flickr.

For instance, here’s a 3D clip from the popular Avatar movie that you’ll only enjoy if you have the right colored glasses.

Create 3-D Glasses at Home!

The basic 3D glasses are available for around 99¢ on eBay but if you want them right now, you can build your own using a spare CD jewel case and some permanent marker pens.

Just scribble the transparent side of the jewel case with red and blue marker pens* large enough to cover the width of your eyes. The blue (or cyan) color lens is for the right eye while the red color will cover the left eye.

photo via labnol.org

read more:  http://www.labnol.org/home/make-3d-glasses/13776/

Rayqual adapters get your Canon and Nikon lenses on Sony NEX compact cameras

Finally, interchangeable lens cameras that are compatible with other brand-lenses. Being a bit of a Canon-freak myself i’d say: ‘Canon, why don’t you?”’

photo credit via wired.com

One of the biggest (and most overlooked) advantages of mirrorless cameras is that they can be adapted to work with almost any lens there is. The short distance between the throat of the lens-mount and the sensor means that there is a lot of space for an adapter. Rayqual, a Japanese manufacturer, has just announced a range of these adapters for the new Sony NEX-3 and NEX-5 cameras.

Lens adapters for 35mm SLRs don’t really work well as the extra thickness pushes the lens forward and prevents it from focusing at infinity (you can still shoot close up, though. In fact, macro-extension tubes exploit this focus shift to do their job). But there is a good inch of room to play with on mirrorless cameras, so the adapters work well. I use one on a Panasonic GF1 to attach Nikon lenses. You lose auto-focus, but otherwise it works great.

Rayqual’s new adapters let you mount Nikon, Canon FD, Pentax and Leica lenses onto the Sonys. If you are using modern lenses designed for crop-sensors, you will have minimal changes to the focal length, as the NEX cameras also have APS-C sized sensors.

Shipping next month, the adapters will run from ¥19,950 to ¥25,200, or $220 to $275.

Read More http://tinyurl.com/23rpuwt via wired.com

and

read more here: http://tinyurl.com/266k2fy via gizmag.com

Long exposure Photography examples and lightpainting tutorial!

Long Exposure Photography is very popular technique for photographers at different skill-levels. Everybody can find something interesting and unique in the process of doing long-exposure-shots and the outcome might be surprising yourself.

Here are some great examples we found at photoble.com.

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to see more examples head over here:

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What follows next is a Great great, short, but very effective tutorial about making Light-paintings!

Take a few minutes to watch it and i promise you, you won’t be sorry if you did. It is simply a: ‘Must-See’. 😀

Enjoy!

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made by mindbites.com

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by manifeste

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Great examples of shortclips, shot at 1000 frames per second

To this day, there has been a great progress in development regarding all kinds of film-techniques and the companies that apply them. It is good to see that with various brands of camera’s the same techniques can be used so we, the customers and users, can benefit from it and choose whatever fits our needs.

Here are some lovely examples of shortclips that are shot at 1000 frames per second.

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Guide to Making a Stop-Motion Video

Introduction to Stop-Motion Animation

Stop-motion is a unique filmmaking technique that allows you to make your own movies by using a conventional digital camera and many individual pictures. A movie, in essence, is a bunch of frames (pictures) strung together and played back at 24 to 30 frames per second (fps). The higher the frame rate, the smoother the action will appear in the final movie.

A stop-motion films works the same way. Numerous pictures (frames) are shot with subtle changes between adjacent frames. When played in its entirety, the frame to frame changes convey motion. Like an animated cartoon, the animator must draw out each frame with minor changes.

Make a Stop-Motion Video using These Tips

Get Organized: Have an Outline of Your Ideas

The very first step to any movie is creating an outline and/or storyboard. Visualize the action and how you want the movie to look like. If you can’t clearly visualize it, how do you plan to shoot it?

Determine How Long You Want Each Scene to Be

By gauging the length of each scene and the frame rate of the movie, you can estimate the number of frames you will need for each scene. Say you want the movie to be a smooth 15fps. That means for a 10 second scene, you will need to shoot 150 frames!

Give Yourself Plenty of Time

Plan ahead. For the sake of continuity, shoot each scene in its entirety before taking a break or coming back. The extra effort will show in the final movie. By allowing more time for your project, you also minimize the chance of making mistakes which will be very apparent from frame to frame.

Use a Tripod and NEVER Move the Camera

An absolute must for stop-motion is the use of a tripod. Setting the camera on a table is just not going to cut it. Any slight bumps or shifts in camera position will completely kill the flow of your animation.

Keep Your Exposure and Lighting Consistent

If your camera has it, use the manual mode (M on the dial). Manually set your aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and white balance and lock it down. As previously stated, subtle changes will stick out! The same goes for lighting, shoot in a consistent environment, preferably with artificial lighting since natural lighting has a tendency to change throughout the day, both in intensity and direction.
Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/video/articles/64948.aspx#ixzz0gap2cnEU

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Here are some examples of Stop-Motion clips: