Architecture Photography: Beauty of Interior and Exterior Designs

American architect Julia Morgan once said, “Architecture is a visual art, and the buildings speak for themselves.“.

Indeed, architecture serves as a voice to express the artistic stance of the architect at that time. Photography takes a step further to interpret architecture in several ways. What used to be an accurate portrayal of the structure has now gradually evolved into a manipulation of different perspectives to bring out the interesting elements of a single structure. The art of photographing architecture takes on many forms. Whether it is photographing the exterior or interior, many awesome images can be resulted with the correct techniques and more importantly, the observant eye to spot the different points of view.

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Like other types of photography, what lies ahead is always a series of challenges for photographers before an excellent shot is taken. However, there are two main challenges in architecture photography – Lighting and Image distortion. When photographing the exterior, natural lighting is all you have got and you have to capture the building at its most glamorous moment. Image distortion occurs when the building has lines running horizontally and vertically and they appear distorted. The right equipment and the right angles would prevent that pitfall.

Interior architecture with repeating patterns and geometric shapes is a bonus to photographers.

Employing the use of different camera angles would reveal the beauty of these designs. Architecture with unique and unusual structures also tend to catch our attention. We can’t help but start to ponder how it was made (or maybe built) possible. Photography comes into play as it does justice to impressive architecture.

For many more stunning photographs head over to Hongkiat.com.

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Guide to Making a Stop-Motion Video

Introduction to Stop-Motion Animation

Stop-motion is a unique filmmaking technique that allows you to make your own movies by using a conventional digital camera and many individual pictures. A movie, in essence, is a bunch of frames (pictures) strung together and played back at 24 to 30 frames per second (fps). The higher the frame rate, the smoother the action will appear in the final movie.

A stop-motion films works the same way. Numerous pictures (frames) are shot with subtle changes between adjacent frames. When played in its entirety, the frame to frame changes convey motion. Like an animated cartoon, the animator must draw out each frame with minor changes.

Make a Stop-Motion Video using These Tips

Get Organized: Have an Outline of Your Ideas

The very first step to any movie is creating an outline and/or storyboard. Visualize the action and how you want the movie to look like. If you can’t clearly visualize it, how do you plan to shoot it?

Determine How Long You Want Each Scene to Be

By gauging the length of each scene and the frame rate of the movie, you can estimate the number of frames you will need for each scene. Say you want the movie to be a smooth 15fps. That means for a 10 second scene, you will need to shoot 150 frames!

Give Yourself Plenty of Time

Plan ahead. For the sake of continuity, shoot each scene in its entirety before taking a break or coming back. The extra effort will show in the final movie. By allowing more time for your project, you also minimize the chance of making mistakes which will be very apparent from frame to frame.

Use a Tripod and NEVER Move the Camera

An absolute must for stop-motion is the use of a tripod. Setting the camera on a table is just not going to cut it. Any slight bumps or shifts in camera position will completely kill the flow of your animation.

Keep Your Exposure and Lighting Consistent

If your camera has it, use the manual mode (M on the dial). Manually set your aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and white balance and lock it down. As previously stated, subtle changes will stick out! The same goes for lighting, shoot in a consistent environment, preferably with artificial lighting since natural lighting has a tendency to change throughout the day, both in intensity and direction.
Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/video/articles/64948.aspx#ixzz0gap2cnEU

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Here are some examples of Stop-Motion clips: