Mind Games: Four Games You Control With Your Brain

Forget using your body to control your video games, or making realistic motions with a game controller to make similar movements in the game. The future of toys and video games will be the ones that only require you to sit still, concentrate and use your brain. The EEG technology used in hospitals to measure brainwaves has found its way into the consumer market in the form of games that let you move control the game piece or character just by thinking really hard. The games using the technology are currently pretty simple, but it’s easy to imagine that mind-controlled games could soon let you do everything that games with hand-held controllers do now.

A simpler toy that uses the same brain-controlled air stream concept is the Star Wars Force Trainer. It doesn’t involve any complicated mazes or guiding the ball through hoops; you just have to control the flow of air to Yoda’s cues. As you learn to control your concentration and brain waves more effectively, you move through the Jedi ranks. Hopefully the constant Star Wars sound effects don’t distract you from achieving your destiny. If you’re ready to start your training, the Star Wars Force Trainer is available from Think Geek for around $130.

The technology used in both of the above toys was developed by NeuroSky, a San Jose, California-based company. They also offer their own take on brainwave games with the NeuroSky Mindset. The headset looks a little like a hands-free telephone headset with the microphone in the wrong place. The starter set comes with “Brainwave Visualizer,” an application that lets you control on-screen shapes based on your state of mind. A demonstration of The Adventures of Neuroboy is also included; the demo has you use your mental muscles to push, pull, lift and burn on-screen objects. A game called Math Trainer is also included with the Mindset, and apparently lets you answer math questions with your mind. Several other applications are in the works, and NeuroSky seems devoted to figuring out fun new ways to use brainwaves as entertainment. The company even offers development tools to help users create their own games and content for use with the Mindset. Get the starter kit from NeuroSky’s online store for $199.

Read More over here: http://gajitz.com/mind-games-four-games-you-control-with-your-brain/

Flying Robot Swarm Takes Off

The Ecole Polytechnic Federale de Lausanne in Switzerland is developing swarms of flying robots that could be deployed in disaster areas to create communication networks for rescuers. The Swarming Micro Air Vehicle Network (SMAVNET) project comprises of robust, lightweight robots and software that allows the devices to wirelessly communicate with each other.

The flying robots were built out of expanded polypropylene with a single motor at the rear and two elevons (control surfaces that enable steering). The robots are equipped with autopilot to control altitude, airspeed and turn rate. A micro-controller operates using three sensors — a gyroscope and two pressure sensors. The robots also have a GPS module to log flight journeys.

The swarm controllers running Linux are connected to an off-the-shelf USB Wi-Fi dongle. The output of these (the desired turn rate, speed or altitude) is sent to the autopilot.

For the swarming, robots react to wireless communication with either neighbouring robots or rescuers, rather than relying on GPS or other positioning sensors that might be unreliable, impractical or expensive. Software algorithms that know where other nearby bots are can stop them from crashing into each other.

Read More HERE

YEE Has Been Designed To Make Your Dream Of A Flying Car Come True

I have no idea in what stage the development of this car is….buuut i kinda like it!

 

Designer : Pan Jiazhi, Zhu Wenxi, and Lai Zexin

 

Starting from mass people who can barely manage to buy a car, even worse can hire a taxi to multimillionaire who can easily buy a plane definitely dreams for such a car that can fly. To make this dream come true, the YEE car has been designed with the ability to instantly become a flying machine and taking-off without the need of a runway. This concept will give relief from the hectic city traffic, as well as provide quick commuting alternative with the excitement of an enjoyable flight. This super cool car can quickly switch to flying mode by upturning the front wheels sideways and rear wheels to the outside back. Therefore, the rear wheels were specially designed to serve the purpose of a propeller. Aside from solar charging through the panels spread over the ceiling, this flying car can be charged when docked at the flying station that acts as a transit depot too for the car.

 

Designer : Pan Jiazhi, Zhu Wenxi, and Lai Zexin

Read more via http://www.tuvie.com/yee-has-been-designed-to-make-your-dream-of-a-flying-car-come-true/

Rayqual adapters get your Canon and Nikon lenses on Sony NEX compact cameras

Finally, interchangeable lens cameras that are compatible with other brand-lenses. Being a bit of a Canon-freak myself i’d say: ‘Canon, why don’t you?”’

photo credit via wired.com

One of the biggest (and most overlooked) advantages of mirrorless cameras is that they can be adapted to work with almost any lens there is. The short distance between the throat of the lens-mount and the sensor means that there is a lot of space for an adapter. Rayqual, a Japanese manufacturer, has just announced a range of these adapters for the new Sony NEX-3 and NEX-5 cameras.

Lens adapters for 35mm SLRs don’t really work well as the extra thickness pushes the lens forward and prevents it from focusing at infinity (you can still shoot close up, though. In fact, macro-extension tubes exploit this focus shift to do their job). But there is a good inch of room to play with on mirrorless cameras, so the adapters work well. I use one on a Panasonic GF1 to attach Nikon lenses. You lose auto-focus, but otherwise it works great.

Rayqual’s new adapters let you mount Nikon, Canon FD, Pentax and Leica lenses onto the Sonys. If you are using modern lenses designed for crop-sensors, you will have minimal changes to the focal length, as the NEX cameras also have APS-C sized sensors.

Shipping next month, the adapters will run from ¥19,950 to ¥25,200, or $220 to $275.

Read More http://tinyurl.com/23rpuwt via wired.com

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read more here: http://tinyurl.com/266k2fy via gizmag.com