Augmented Reality Cinema App Brings Movies to Real Life

via (Gajitz)

True movie lovers know that there aren’t many things more thrilling than visiting the very locations where your favorite movies were shot. Call it cinematic tourism or just giving your movie experiences a brand new layer; either way, it can be a fun and interesting way to enhance both your movie experiences and your vacation. A new smartphone app called AR Cinema will use the power of GPS along with augmented reality to actually bring you into your favorite films.

Visit a street corner or landmark where a movie was filmed, hold up your smartphone and the app will show you the scene(s) shot there. The demo video shows films set in London, but the developers want to add additional cities. Of course, the people who live in those cities might not be thrilled with the cinema tourists holding up their phones in the middle of the street to watch movie clips, but this awesome idea could add a whole new layer to the tourism trade in cities like London, New York, Toronto and other frequently-used shooting locations.

via read more here: http://gajitz.com/augmented-reality-cinema-app-brings-movies-to-real-life/

Long exposure Photography examples and lightpainting tutorial!

Long Exposure Photography is very popular technique for photographers at different skill-levels. Everybody can find something interesting and unique in the process of doing long-exposure-shots and the outcome might be surprising yourself.

Here are some great examples we found at photoble.com.

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to see more examples head over here:

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What follows next is a Great great, short, but very effective tutorial about making Light-paintings!

Take a few minutes to watch it and i promise you, you won’t be sorry if you did. It is simply a: ‘Must-See’. 😀

Enjoy!

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made by mindbites.com

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by manifeste

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Guide to Making a Stop-Motion Video

Introduction to Stop-Motion Animation

Stop-motion is a unique filmmaking technique that allows you to make your own movies by using a conventional digital camera and many individual pictures. A movie, in essence, is a bunch of frames (pictures) strung together and played back at 24 to 30 frames per second (fps). The higher the frame rate, the smoother the action will appear in the final movie.

A stop-motion films works the same way. Numerous pictures (frames) are shot with subtle changes between adjacent frames. When played in its entirety, the frame to frame changes convey motion. Like an animated cartoon, the animator must draw out each frame with minor changes.

Make a Stop-Motion Video using These Tips

Get Organized: Have an Outline of Your Ideas

The very first step to any movie is creating an outline and/or storyboard. Visualize the action and how you want the movie to look like. If you can’t clearly visualize it, how do you plan to shoot it?

Determine How Long You Want Each Scene to Be

By gauging the length of each scene and the frame rate of the movie, you can estimate the number of frames you will need for each scene. Say you want the movie to be a smooth 15fps. That means for a 10 second scene, you will need to shoot 150 frames!

Give Yourself Plenty of Time

Plan ahead. For the sake of continuity, shoot each scene in its entirety before taking a break or coming back. The extra effort will show in the final movie. By allowing more time for your project, you also minimize the chance of making mistakes which will be very apparent from frame to frame.

Use a Tripod and NEVER Move the Camera

An absolute must for stop-motion is the use of a tripod. Setting the camera on a table is just not going to cut it. Any slight bumps or shifts in camera position will completely kill the flow of your animation.

Keep Your Exposure and Lighting Consistent

If your camera has it, use the manual mode (M on the dial). Manually set your aperture, shutter speed, ISO, and white balance and lock it down. As previously stated, subtle changes will stick out! The same goes for lighting, shoot in a consistent environment, preferably with artificial lighting since natural lighting has a tendency to change throughout the day, both in intensity and direction.
Read more: http://www.brighthub.com/multimedia/video/articles/64948.aspx#ixzz0gap2cnEU

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Here are some examples of Stop-Motion clips: