water calligraphy device at beijing design week 2011

water calligraphy device at beijing design week 2011.


‘water calligraphy device’ by nicholas hanna, on exhibition during beijing design week 2011
image © designboom

‘water calligraphy device’ by canada-born, beijing-based media artist nicholas hanna
reinterprets the chinese tradition of using a water brush to write poetry in public spaces
by transforming a flat-bead tricycle into a poetry-writing device.

in beijing, these tricycles are a common form of transportation, adapted by residents
into everything from carts to traveling market stalls. hanna’s ‘water calligraphy device’
uses a computer, mounted on the handlebars, to transmit passages of chinese literature
to an electrical system and array of solenoid valves. each character is converted into a dot matrix,
to which the valves synchronize the release of droplets of water as the tricycle moves forward.
thus as the device moves forward, passages of text appear behind it, only to gradually evaporate
just as in traditional water brush painting.

‘water calligraphy device’ is traveling through beijing’s historic dashilar district
through october 3rd, 2011, as part of beijing design week.

video courtesy of nicholas hanna


the project draws from the chinese tradition of writing calligraphy in public spaces using a water brush


view of the device in use


closer view of the characters


the tricycle leaves poetry in its wake as it travels through the neighborhoods of dashilar, beijing


view of the solenoid valve system
image © designboom

for more head over here : http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/10/view/16848/nicholas-hanna-water-calligraphy-device-at-beijing-design-week-2011.html

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Brilliantly Brainy: Do Art Cars Dream of Electric Beeps?

 

Most drivers have a very strong connection to their vehicles. It’s almost as though our cars are an extension of our own bodies; we ride around in our metal and plastic cocoons, seeing the world through the attached windows and mirrors. But what if our cars themselves had memories and dreams?

 

The Brain Car is a moving sculpture from artist Olaf Mooij. On the back of an old hearse sits a huge brain-like sculpture that looks awesome enough by day. But by night, it lights up with another type of awesome entirely.

All day as it is traveling, the Brain Car records images of where it goes and the sights it encounters. Then after dark, the Brain Car remixes those “memories” and an interior projector replays on the inside surface of the brain.

 

Read more here: gajitz

Can We Change our Behavior to Make Us Happier?

This is a fun and creative title sequence for “The Happy Film” (scheduled to be released in 2012). It was directed by reknown designers Stefan Sagmeister and Hillman Curtis, produced by Ben Nabors, and cinematography by Ben Wolf.

Notes about the movie (from official website):

The Happy Film takes a look at the strategies serious psychologists ‘recommend to improve one’s personal well-being and overall happiness. Questions such as ‘Is it possible to train our mind in the same way’ that we train our bodies?’ and ‘Can we change our behavior to make’us happier?’ will be put to the test in this highly visual documentary.

Designer Stefan Sagmeister will attempt a long list of various strategies – ‘from the sublime to the ridiculous – and report back on the results. ‘The documentary’s experiments and explorations are loosely based on Stefan’s book Things I Have Learned in My Life So Far. Though the focus will be on the ability of meditation, cognitive therapy, and pharmaceuticals to significantly alter well-being – the maxims from his book will ‘serve as access points to a larger exploration of happiness, it’s cultural’ significance, our constant pursuit of it, and its uniquely ephemeral nature. Throughout these experiments, our team will work closely with a group’ of health professionals to properly define and assess Stefan’s happiness.

Links via: Film stills © The Happy Film Link via Boooooom  &  

Illusion.com

Stelarc: Pushing the body’s boundaries

Stelarc.jpg

(Image: Newspix/Rex Features)

(Image: Newspix/Rex Features)

The Australian performance artist with an ear on his arm discusses his work challenging what it is to be human

As an artist, what is your role in shaping technology?
It’s a very modest one. Each new technology generates novel information and unexpected images of the body and the world, which often destabilises our paradigms of what a body is and how it operates. Technology generates uncertainty, it constructs the unexpected. That’s what makes it exciting to incorporate as part of artistic expression.

What is it about the boundaries of the body that fascinates you?
All of my projects explore alternate anatomical architectures – a body with a third hand, or an extra ear, or an artwork inside a bodily space instead of a public space.

We are biological bodies, but we are often accelerated, augmented and enhanced by technology. There may be a time soon when bodies become portals of sensory experience. I might be able to see with your eyes when you are in New York, for example, or listen with someone’s ears from London. We can no longer think of the body as simplistically bound by its skin and containing a single self.

Will it become harder to tell where we end and technology begins?
That’s beginning to be the case. In 1000 years’ time, perhaps technology will be invisible because it will be inside our bodies. We will be able to recolonise the human body with micromachines, nanosensors and nanobots that augment our bacterial and viral population.

Will the body become obsolete?
I think that the body is obsolete. From the standpoint that it’s increasingly inadequate to cope with the technological terrain it inhabits. That doesn’t mean we can do without a body; there has to be some kind of embodiment. But I think the possibilities are there for unexpected hybrids of biology, technology and computer code. We are very much a meat, metal and software system now.

Do you worry that your work combining technology and the body might jeopardise your health?
There’s been no deliberate attempt to endanger the body, but to do anything physically difficult or technically complicated, yes, those actions might be risky. You do things with a positive attitude and a sense that you need to do this if you are to achieve anything.

Is physical discomfort part of exploring the body’s boundaries?
Only in a very general sense. If you are going to suspend your body with 18 hooks in the skin, and you are going to be hoisted 60 metres high by a large crane, there may be all sorts of possible problems. You anticipate those and try to take appropriate precautions. Those performances were not done to have a painful experience.

Why do you have an ear on your left arm?
At the moment this is only a relief of an ear. It’s partly surgically constructed and partly cell grown. We need to surgically lift the helix to create an ear flap, and then we will grow a soft earlobe using my adult stem cells. When the ear is more of a three dimensional structure we will reinsert the microphone and connect it to a wireless transmitter. Then any Wi-Fi hotspot will internet-enable the ear.

We are replicating a bodily structure, relocating and then rewiring it for additional capabilities.

Read More over here: http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/culturelab/2011/07/stelarc-pushing-the-bodys-boundaries.html

Scratch Art: U.S. Dollars Sculpted Into Incredible Works

Where art is concerned, is the medium as important as the message? In his 2011 exhibition Noblesse Oblige, tattoo artist Scott Campbell explores some unconventional materials that call into question our perceptions of that unique relationship. His series of carvings made of uncut U.S. currency throw together unparalleled opulence (wasting money) and working-class imagery.

 

Campbell’s history as a tattoo artist shows through in the images he carves into huge stacks of American money. Relying heavily on skulls, skeletons, butterflies and other pictures that would be at home in the pages of a flash book in a tattoo studio, these unusual sculptures are truly a study in differences.

These pieces, with their tattoo art sensibilities and the over-the-top abundance of their materials, present a strange type of experience for fine art lovers. Much like the artists who paint with their own blood or box up their own excrement, the medium changes the message.

Read more over here: Via weburbanist

10 High Quality Seamless Patterns You Must Add To Your Design Arson

(via creativenerds)

So its coming up to 6months since Creative Nerds team launched their 3rd design blog Vector Patterns so far it’s been pleasure to work on. To celebrate 6months of Vector Patterns where going to run down Top 10 Vector Patterns which we have featured on the site, this is to showcase to new readers to vector patterns the best content which has been featured on the site so far. Stay tuned to Vector Patterns because there’s a lot more great content on the horizon.

A Very Beautiful Floral Seamless Vector Pattern

 Metal Seamless Photoshop And Illustrator Pattern

Ornament Free Seamless Vector Pattern

For many more Patterns go over here to download: http://creativenerds.co.uk/freebies/10-high-quality-seamless-patterns-you-must-add-to-your-design-arson/

Trompe L’oeil: Artistic Wall Murals that Bend & Twist Reality

 

surreal Murals

Trompe L’oeil, french for “deceive the eye,” is the art of creating two dimensional images with such realism that they appear to be in three dimensions. A trick often used in the backdrop of classic films before the advent of green screen technology, these illusions are found in cities across the world.


 
 

 

Surreal Murals - trompe-loeil-wall

 



Why add a window to a drab backyard or side alley, when one can have one that opens into a gorgeous world. Feeling claustrophobic? Gaze out into the lush jungle on the other side of your wall.







Imagine walking down the street and stumbling upon a building that looks like the surface of a disturbed pond. This is one of the most dedicated examples, and stunning in the largeness of its scale.



READ MORE over here: http://weburbanist.com/2011/01/13/trompe-loeil-murals-that-twist-reality/